FINDING COMMON GROUND IN OUR COMMUNITY

The APMG mission is to enrich the mind and nourish the spirit; to expand the perspectives of our audiences; and help them strengthen their communities. Given that THEIR communities are OUR communities, it is up to us to better understand the communities where we operate if we want to be part of strengthening those communities.
Community

On Thursday, November 7th volunteers from SCPR participated in a community outreach effort at the VA West Los Angeles to honor our national veterans.  

 

SCPR volunteers greeted veterans, helped set up and serve over 300 meals, assisted with a clothing drive, and took souvenir photos of veterans with celebrity guests.

 

Many thanks to the following colleagues who volunteered their time and energy to work the event:

 

Pam Gurstein

Kelly Kolla

Roy Lenn

Veronica Lopez

Jennifer Miller

Collin Mitchell

Rita Pardue

Konie Phan-McGinty

 

 

                  

 

         

Salvador of Miami, Florida, believes that ”more focus and attention to basic infrastructure in cities like Palmetto Bay, Doral, Medley, Hialeah, Miami, and Homestead to support the manufacturing industry bringing jobs back to South Florida” is the biggest way to improve his community. He identifies small and medium manufacturing businesses in South Florida as the real movers and shakers of his community. 

This story was produced with the help of the Public Insight Network. Share your community’s story of real change here.

“’Georgia’s Girl’ believes that being of service to others is an opportunity, privilege and a blessing. We believe that consumers can impact the quality of life for women and girls through the purchase of a handbag. We come in many shades, however our unique sisterhood and common experiences bond us.  No matter what the storm may be right now in our lives, it shall pass because we know another sister made it through.  And ‘Georgia’s Girl’ is proud to play a part in this process. “

Paulette of Minn., on her business, Georgia’s Girl Handbags, LLC. She makes and donates handbags to various programs and services, including Ready for Success, which provides men and women experiencing poverty, homelessness, or who are transitioning out of incarceration with business attire and accessories. In addition to donating, she sells her handbags, the proceeds of which go to similar causes.

This story was produced with the help of the Public Insight Network. Share your community’s story of real change here

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Started in 1996, InProgress is a small non-profit that fosters the artist in Minneapolis and St. Paul’s underserved youth. Focused specifically in the Latin@, Hmong and Indigenous communities, though open to all, InProgress provides participants with computers, cameras, software, and most other things needed to create any and all digital media art. They also hold workshops on how to operate those things. InProgress believes in empowerment through the art(s) of digital storytelling. As they put it in their mission statement,

"Those of us that work with In Progress are committed to breaking down barriers of geography, class, education, and culture. We use digital artmaking as a tool for public discourse, while building the skills of young people so they may create, teach and lead."

“Mary and Jerry Kern: the Colorado Symphony Orchestra would not exist today without their incredible dedication and support.”

Terry of Lakewood, Colo., cannot imagine her community without this musical institution and without the Kerns it wouldn’t be quite the place that it is. 

This story was produced with the help of the Public Insight Network. Share your community’s story of real change here


Upon first glance, you might think Express Yourself Clothing, is much like any other new and gently used clothing exchange operation. You sell clothes you never wore, and usually end up spending the money you just made on something you find in the store. However, its much more than that. Like its Youth Express sibling, Express Bike Shop, proceeds fund the store’s internship program, which gives urban youth the chance to get work experience, and learn the ins and outs of running a small business. Ladies, donate or sell your next batch of unwanted clothes, shoes or accessories here!

“Volunteering is giving back. Volunteering is a lifestyle.”

- Jean Ann of Minneapolis, Minn., is a tour guide at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, an art collector, a facilitator at Restorative Justice Community Action, a leader of ESL conversations, and an usher at various theatres around the Twin Cities. These are the ways she is working to make her community a better place.

This story was produced with the help of the Public Insight Network. Share your community’s story of real change here

“I love my job because we really help people.”

- Laura Torres of Minn., on her job as a recruiter at Summit Academy OIC. She helps to seek out and enroll students of all ages at her school. Summit Academy partners with other service agencies to provide vocational training, career counseling, and leadership development, among a host of other services. The school offers morning and night classes, and also provides transportation and childcare. This past spring was their largest graduating class at 230 students.

This story was produced with the help of the Public Insight Network. Share your community’s story of real change here

In addition to the services we expect at a bike shop (repairs, new and used bikes and parts for sale, and a spread of accessories) St. Paul’s Express Bike Shop has a mission in mind. Much like Full Cycle Bike Shop in Minneapolis’s Powderhorn Park area, proceeds fund the shop’s internships, which teach urban and underserved youth both bike mechanics and business skills. The shop is an arm of Keystone Community Service’s Youth Express program, which partners with local businesses to give youth work experience. What a great idea. So next time you clean out your garage, consider donating your old rusty bike to this social enterprise!

“In five years he has not only built a restaurant business that is a fixture in our community, but he and his operation are a model of sustainable and community business.”

- Joyce of Minn., on Ruhel Islam, an immigrant from Bangladesh who owns and manages Gandhi Mahal Restaurant in Longfellow, which serves Bangladeshi and Indian cuisine. Cooking produce grown mostly in community farms around the city, using reusable containers for leftovers, and donating to and volunteering for global and local causes around issues of food justice, Gandhi Mahal seeks to provide an eating and gathering place that is healthful and peaceful inside and out. Joyce believes Ruhel to be an unsung hero, as he has brought diversity to the area, something she thinks fortifies a community.

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This story was produced with the help of the Public Insight Network. Share your community’s story of real change here